Day 1: Create & Challenge

Start your camp with creativity and team building at Capital E! First up, it’s exploring Virtual Reality in MediaLab. Next up, City Gallery WellingtonJoin the gallery educators for a Mural Tour and Screenprinting Workshop. Create a screenprint inspired by what you have seen incorporating kupu Māori.  

Day 2: Protest & Demonstrate

Start your day at Wellington Museum, which gives students the chance to connect the past, present, and future. In our Protest and Action programmestudents reflect on the driving factors behind social changeand contemporary issues. After lunch, it’s on to Capital E’s OnTV where your class will create their own TV show!

Day 3: Tour & Explore

Take the Cable Car up to Space Place, where your students will discover the collection of telescopes in a Telescope Tour. Eat a packed lunch in always beautiful Botanic Gardens.  Next up, Nairn Street CottageThe cottage is a 30 minute walk from Space Place. Here your students can explore Waves of Migrationwith a guided visit of the Wallis family home
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The Future of Monuments

Today, many want to pull down war memorials as expressions of bad politics, especially those memorials that legitimise evil and injustice. Are there 'good' war memorials—and who decides? Can we make use of 'bad' war memorials? How do we understand miscellaneous contemporary war-memorial projects, like Peter Eisenman's Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe in Berlin and Ground Zero in New York, or Weta and Te Papa's The Scale of War and Peter Jackson 'colourising' World War I footage? What form could future memorials take?

Everyday Mysticism: Artists Respond 

8pm 

Sculptor Glen Hayward’s practice brings the everyday into the gallery in profound and absurd ways. Reconsidering familiar objects is a concern shared by other artists. Join us as they discuss their practices and why they find commonplace objects compelling. 

Urn (Live)

9pm

Sonic artists Thomas Carroll (Ngati Maru, Hauraki) and Rob Tyler respond to the themes of Matarau. Fusing taonga pūoro and modular synthesis, they incorporate rongoā plants as a modulation source, to create works inspired by Māori philosophy, cosmology and experimental noise music.  

IMAGE Glen Hayward: Wish You Were Here City Gallery Wellington Te Whare Toi 2022. Photo Elias Rodriguez.

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The Artists

Darcy Nicholas

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Elaine Bevan

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Pip Devonshire

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Sonia Snowden

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Exhibition: Saturday 9th December 2023 to 1st April 2024

Tracey Morgan

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Toi Rangatira, Ngāti Toa

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Tracey Patete

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Nui Stretch

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Vianney Parata |Kauia Moriarty | Moana Solomon

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Hinepūororangi Tahupārae

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Brett Rangitaawa

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Kura Puke with Stuart Foster

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Chevron Hassett

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Ngatai Taepa

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Rangi Kipa

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Hermann Salzmann

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Wiremu Grace

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Kura Puke, Mike Bridgman,  Amber-Jayne Bain, Kurt Komene 

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Tukutuku roopu: Whitireia Te Reo

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Ko ngā taonga tuku iho a Te Waka Huia, i whakaemihia e George Pain i te rau tau ki muri.  He reo ngū, he kōrero kua ngaro ki rāhaki, takoto noa.

I pōhiritia ngā ringa rehe toi o Te Upoko o Te Ika a Māui ki te whakaoho i te mauri o ngā taonga nei.  

Nā te wānanga, me te koi o aua ringa rehe, ka hangaia ngā taonga hou hei hoa mo ngā taonga o nehe kia puawai ano.

He mea tauawhi te whakaaturanga e Te Waka Huia me Toi Māori Aotearoa.


Wellington Museum |Te Waka Huia O Ngā Taonga Tuku Iho holds taonga Māori collected by George Pain, a late-nineteenth-century businessman based in Martinborough.

Unfortunately, the history of these taonga was not documented and they have been sitting silently in the collection store.

So we invited Māori artists from Te Upoko o te Ika a Māui (the greater Wellington region) to bring their knowledge to the collection and give life and warmth to these taonga.

The artists have not only enhanced our understanding of the Pain collection, they have also created new works that awhi (support, embrace) selected taonga and kōrero (speak) to the original makers.  

This exhibition was developed by Wellington Museum in partnership with Toi Māori Aotearoa – Māori Arts New Zealand.

Learn more about the curatorial process